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Your Mind and Body are Talking to Each Other. Are You Listening? section image

Your Mind and Body are Talking to Each Other. Are You Listening?

April 6, 2019

Have you ever experienced a weird pain, or maybe an upset tummy, but you still decided to eat something not so great, or keep doing an activity even though it hurts? This is so common. So very very common. Our body sends our brain signals all the time, literally so much that we can go…

Have you ever experienced a weird pain, or maybe an upset tummy, but you still decided to eat something not so great, or keep doing an activity even though it hurts? This is so common. So very very common. Our body sends our brain signals all the time, literally so much that we can go into autopilot. But other times the signals aren’t so subtle and they can even be super positive messages! Science shows that working out does exactly that. The chemicals your body produces when you get your blood flowing sends all sorts of positive messages to your brain, which ultimately help elevate mood, balance blood sugar and flush away stagnant energy.

This mind-body connection is also widely studied in the world of mental health. Often physical fitness helps to reduce the symptoms of anxiety and depression, which is a wonderful way to offer ourselves some much-needed self-care.

What Are You Training For? For many, mental wellness isn’t an easy thing to talk about or manage. We checked-in with our Tight Club community to learn more about how you prioritize mental wellness, alongside your fitness goals and learned so many great insights and perspectives. Thank you to our community for being vulnerable and open about your challenges. Today Charmaine and Kate share some of their perspectives and we are so grateful for their insights and willingness to share.

Jennifer Northup

3 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Tight Bike

How does fitness make you feel both physically and mentally?

Mentally, I feel like I’m almost turning my brain off, so all I’m thinking about is how I’m moving my body at that moment. So it gives you a break from kind of everything else. How does it physically connect? I think that anytime you are pumping your blood and getting your body moving the endorphins are going. So I think of scientifically what is going in my body. I think also that structure is really important to mental health too, and when you get into routines like getting up at 5 am to go swimming even though it’s raining and cold outside, it’s hard doing it, but once you finish you can say that I still have the rest of my day and I started my day off in a good way. There is something about routines that really supports mental health too.

Alfred Kolowrat

2 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Tight Bike

How does fitness make you feel both physically and mentally?

I think just focusing on the body movement and technique and how the endorphins are kind of motivating me to get an hour and a half indoor bike ride done, even though it’s mentally hard to keep that motivation going. The completion I think is really important because it’s like saying that I’ve won the day already, and it’s like 6 am, and you’ve already made the bed, had a workout… And sometimes it’s really hard, and some days we don’t do it, but when we do go for it, the day is a win already.

Vanessa Tam

5 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Booty Luv

How does fitness make you feel both physically and mentally?

Physically I feel strong and healthy when I’m working out. I think sweating is a good correlation with strength and health as well. And mentally, I feel really clear and I feel more focused. Especially if I’m stuck on something or if I find that I’m procrastinating or not getting the work done that I need to, then I feel like working out is a good way to refocus and clear my head mentally.

Cristina Alabado

5 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Booty Luv

How does fitness make you feel both physically and mentally?

If I feel fit, I also feel like I have enough energy to do what I want to do mentally, because otherwise, I have the exhaustion that is just draining. And you don’t want to do things you’d normally want to, like go out or just get projects done and see people and have the energy to do that. So for me, fitness is you’re looking good, feeling good and you’re able to do the things you want to do. So that transfers into your regular life as well.

Intro and interviews by Sarah Tesla. Photos by Bree Sopatyk. 

What Are You Training For? Removing the “Self” Stigma From Self-Care

March 17, 2019

There is a lot of confusion about what all this self-care talk is all about. Is it about living a life where you do whatever you want? Nope. Is it about indulging in something without consequences? Not that either. I think people get stuck on the “self” part and forget that it’s attached to the…

There is a lot of confusion about what all this self-care talk is all about. Is it about living a life where you do whatever you want? Nope. Is it about indulging in something without consequences? Not that either. I think people get stuck on the “self” part and forget that it’s attached to the word “care.” Taking care of oneself is not selfish. In fact, it’s not only a great service to your own well-being but to your ability to support others.

Self-care is also about discipline. Yup. It’s knowing when to say ‘no’ when your time or emotional energy is spread too thin. Or maybe it’s saying ‘no’ to that last drink on Wednesday night because you know you’ll sleep better or feel better the next day. It is also about setting the alarm and getting your butt out the door to your 6 am Tight Club class. It is also as simple and important as acknowledging to yourself that you are doing the best you can, and maybe today you need to rest and take care of your mental health. Whatever is on your list, one thing is for sure, self-care is a thoughtful practice about honouring what you need in order to feel healthy both in mind and body. Nothing selfish about that.

What Are You Training For? For many, mental wellness isn’t an easy thing to talk about or manage. We checked-in with our Tight Club community to learn more about how you prioritize mental wellness, alongside your fitness goals and learned so many great insights and perspectives. Thank you to our community for being vulnerable and open about your challenges. Today Charmaine and Kate share some of their perspectives and we are so grateful for their insights and willingness to share.

Charmaine Bell-Irving

4 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Tight Sweat

How much do you think about or prioritize your mental wellness/health?

It’s been a really fun and tough year for me, so this year it’s been a much bigger priority for me to think about it. I had a wedding to plan for and we sold our apartment and bought a new place and I also had a miscarriage, had to change jobs and now some happier news is coming. So definitely taking care of myself has been a priority this year, wherein the past I’ve mostly just done things for other people. So this year I’ve definitely switched modes and thought more about myself.

Do you practice self-care? If yes or no, what do you/ or wish to do to bring more mental wellness to your life?

I definitely signed-up for those regular classes every morning at 6 am, just making that a regular routine. Getting that done first thing in the morning is something that I can absolutely control. The rest of the day if things don’t really go my way, I feel like at least I accomplished that one thing. I’m also learning to say no to more things and making sure that whatever I do makes me happy. But yes, giving myself more downtime and prioritizing my own health over pleasing other people all the time is important.

How does fitness make you feel both physically and mentally?

This year because of all those highs and lows, being active at Tight Club on a regular basis has really physically, emotionally and mentally prepared me to take on any adventure or challenge that’s come my way. Whether it be the physical demands of the miscarriage, or just getting through those longs days at work, just being able to handle all of that has really been a source for helping to show me that I’m strong and taught me how to be mentally tough and persevere through any sort of challenge. So it’s really built some strong physical and mental strength for me. I definitely feel more physically prepared to take on the new pregnancy, and all sorts of unknown changes that I feel prepared for.

What do you wish more people would talk openly about when it comes to mental wellness/health? Are there any issues that are of special significance to you?

Definitely, for myself, I felt a lot of relief telling people about the miscarriage. It helped me learn more about what happened and getting a lot of support from other people. For myself that was really important to not internalize everything and try to feel like I can deal with everything by myself. It’s not to project my challenges to other people, but it was really therapeutic to say it out loud. It helped normalize it and I also felt supported and understood by other people, without feeling I had to be carrying these secrets around. So feeling that the other person was guessing that there was something going on, I was just clear, and they also felt connected and also privileged to have that information. Then they feel open to share their challenges with me. I shared it with people at Tight Club, and we see each other at 6 am and it just felt like a family where sharing that felt really good because you could sense the amount of support from everyone.

Kate Lollar

5 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: The Athlete

How much do you think about or prioritize your mental wellness/health?

It’s something that I think about constantly I would say and it’s something that I really try to prioritize. I think to be my best self to my friends and family is something that is really important to me and also to be kind and accepting of myself as well. It’s something that I’ve learned benefits me so I’ve really tried to take time to do things that are good for my mental health.

Do you practice self-care? If yes or no, what do you/ or wish to do to bring more mental wellness to your life?

I do. I think it sometimes depends on my mood. I’m a pretty shy person, but I am extroverted in the sense that I do get energy from being around other people. So self-care to me means sometimes reaching out to a friend and connecting with them on a more meaningful level I would say. If it’s going for dinner, doing something active, getting outside I find that I enjoy my time with other people. Things that I don’t like to do, like cooking for myself for example, I try to make enjoyable by putting a podcast on or putting nice music on. And just really being in that moment and trying to appreciate all of those little things.

How does fitness make you feel both physically and mentally?

I would say it’s all about positive endorphins and I feel really energized after a class. It kind of fills my cup up so to speak. I usually work out at night and it gives me a really nice sleep and I wake up feeling rested and ready to take on the day. But I think that working out with a group also pushes me to be fully in it and not half-ass it.

What do you wish more people would talk openly about when it comes to mental wellness/health? Are there any issues that are of special significance to you?

I think just, in general, I feel fortunate what within my group of friends we’re really open about how we’re feeling and our mental health, and all very supportive of each other. But I think just in general, even at work for instance, if you’re feeling really anxious or not in the right headspace, I still think there is a stigma about that and I think that’s one thing that could change. I know for me anxiety is something that I have and it comes out in some strange ways sometimes and ways that I’m not necessarily proud of or even would want to tell people about I guess. And I would like to remove the shame of that.

Intro and interviews by Sarah Tesla. Photos by Bree Sopatyk. 

What Are You Training For?

February 6, 2019

What Are You Training For? For many, mental wellness isn’t an easy thing to talk about or manage. We checked-in with our Tight Club community to learn more about how you prioritize mental wellness, alongside your fitness goals and learned so many great insights and perspectives. Thank you to our community for being vulnerable and…

What Are You Training For? For many, mental wellness isn’t an easy thing to talk about or manage. We checked-in with our Tight Club community to learn more about how you prioritize mental wellness, alongside your fitness goals and learned so many great insights and perspectives. Thank you to our community for being vulnerable and open about your challenges.

Reagan Belan

2 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Tight TRX

How much do you think about or prioritize your mental wellness/health?

Quite often, I struggle with depression, or I guess manage depression and so it’s a big part of my life.

Sebastian Bryers

1.5 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Booty Luv

How much do you think about or prioritize your mental wellness/health?

I actually think about it a lot and it’s a big part of my daily assessment. At the end of the day, I come home and I run through my brain everything that happened and ask “did I achieve everything I wanted to achieve today?” Sometimes I don’t in terms of work so I try to find something else that I can find a sense of achievement out of, even if it’s nothing to do with anything productive. That’s my mental check-in, and I know that it’s very much focused on productivity but it’s what helps me get rid of the anxiety at the end of the day.

Victoria Emslie

4 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Tight Sweat

How much do you think about or prioritize your mental wellness/health?

Since having Axel 6 months ago it’s been top of mind just because one, in the long term I want to show him what a strong person mom looks like and second because it’s so easy for new moms to forget about themselves, once the baby arrives. And a lot of people that I’ve found have these epic ideas about what motherhood is going to look like and it’s so often different, and so much more stressful. It’s really easy to lose yourself, it’s actually a top priority to make sure I take time for myself and check-in and have some good awareness of my mental health.

Jane Chu

4-5 months at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Tight Sweat

How much do you think about or prioritize your mental wellness/health?

Mental wellness is everything. It is probably a top priority for me because it affects all areas of your life. If you’re not psychologically in a good place — it’s yeah, it’s everything.

Tricia Cummings

4 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: The Athlete

How much do you think about or prioritize your mental wellness/health?

It’s a huge priority and I make sure that I get my workouts first thing in the morning. I actually half-jokingly, not half-jokingly call them my “rage control” because they are the thing that allows me to go out in my day and see things differently and have multiple perspectives on what’s going on in the world.

Brad Roark

2 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Tight Sweat

How much do you think about or prioritize your mental wellness/health?

I prioritize it every day and actually make sure that I get ahead of the game to take care of what I need which is almost always working out and everything falls in place after that.

Words by Sarah Tesla. Photos by Bree Sopatyk. 

Proportional What!? Your Guide to the BC Electoral Reform Referendum

November 27, 2018

Our pals Malloreigh Hamilton and Kala Vilches led a workshop at the studio taking everyone through the ins and outs of the BC Electoral Reform Referendum. With the Canada Post strike currently going on, the deadline has now been extended to December 7th at 4:30pm for all ballots to be received. If you still haven’t…

Our pals Malloreigh Hamilton and Kala Vilches led a workshop at the studio taking everyone through the ins and outs of the BC Electoral Reform Referendum. With the Canada Post strike currently going on, the deadline has now been extended to December 7th at 4:30pm for all ballots to be received.

If you still haven’t submitted yours, here’s Malloreigh’s breakdown on our current system and the options you’re choosing between:

ISSUES WITH OUR CURRENT SYSTEM

Our existing electoral system is called “First Past the Post”. Basically, the candidate that gets the most votes in any particular riding wins that riding, even if only a small amount of the electorate in that riding voted for that candidate (as can happen in ridings with many candidates). Then, the Legislative Assembly is governed by the party who won the most seats, regardless of their share of the popular vote. So a party can end up with a majority government – meaning they can basically make decisions unchecked by opposition – with less than 50% of the popular vote.

This is how vote-splitting happens and why it’s such a problem. We dealt with vote-splitting pretty seriously in the municipal election that just happened; with two strong candidates on the left (Stewart and Sylvester), progressives were torn about whether to vote strategically to ensure a left-wing candidate got in. In the end, due to a massive marketing and support campaign by the NDP and labour union groups, left-wing candidate Kennedy Stewart defeated right-wing candidate Ken Sim by 1,000 votes.

This is an issue we currently deal with at all levels in Canada as FPTP is the system of choice across the country. You’ve probably heard a lot of vitriol about whether strategic voting is a good or bad choice from both supporters and deriders of the practice.

WHY PROPORTIONAL REPRESENTATION?

Proportional Representation systems attempt to reflect better in government the percentage of the electorate that supports a particular party. For example, typically the Green Party of Canada gets 4-7% of the popular vote, but they have only won one seat in the House of Commons in the last two elections (and zero prior to that) – less than 0.3% of the House. The Green Party of BC won 3 seats in the 2017 general election (almost 4% of the seats in the Legislative Assembly), but received almost 17% of the popular vote. This is a huge disparity between how the public votes and how the government is made up.

Some democratic political philosophy suggests that government should be a reflection of the body it governs – whether this reflects just the views of the electorate or whether it reflects identity groups, like, for example, seeing 51% of our elected representatives identifying as female to reflect the proportion of the population at large, or seeing POC in our government to similarly represent the portion of the population that are POC.

In Australia (where voting is mandatory!), their House is elected riding-by-riding like ours, but their Senate is elected via proportional representation based on the percentage of total votes cast by the electorate for each party.

WHY NOT PROPORTIONAL REPRESENTATION?

Opponents of PR will tell you that proportional representation can increase the presence of fringe parties in government. This is absolutely possible. It may be a tiny percentage of the population in each riding voting for fringe parties – be they right wing, left wing, or spaceship wing – but depending on the system, if the total sum of those votes is substantial enough, those fringe parties could in fact get a seat in the Leg. Some people think that’s fine; I personally do not want that. Most of the systems outlined below have a 5% threshold for representation.

Opponents of PR also consider the potential systems to be too confusing. Their argument is that FPTP has worked for our democracy up until now; it’s not broken, so why fix it?

As well, coalitions are more likely to be needed for government to be formed. Right now BC is being governed by a coalition government made up of NDP and Green MLAs. These systems can work really well if the parties making up the coalition can work together well, but it can also result in unstable government that is dissolved more often.

THE PROCESS OF THE REFERENDUM

Elections BC must receive your ballot by 4:30pm on December 7th, 2019. You can either:

  • Mail it
  • Return it in person at a Referendum Service Office or Service BC Centre. Find locations at elections.bc.ca/rso

There are two questions in the ballot.

1. Do you want to stay with existing FPTP or move to a Proportional Representation system?

2. Of the three PR options, rank your first, second, and third choice.

If more than 50% of the ballots returned prefer FPTP, nothing will change. If more than 50% prefer PR, the system with the highest ranking will be adopted. There will be some administrative work to do to put it in place, but it will have to be ready for any provincial elections taking place after July 1, 2021. Riding boundaries will likely change; we may have up to 8 additional MLAs added to our Legislature. There may be more than one MLA representing a particular district. Finally, after two elections using PR, another referendum will be calling to see if BC voters want to go back to FPTP – so if we hate it, it isn’t necessarily permanent.

SO WHAT ARE THE OPTIONS?

Dual-Member Proportional (DMP)

This system was developed in Canada and is not in use – it is at the moment purely theoretical.

This is an interesting system. Large population ridings will have two MLAs, while low population (rural) ridings will continue to have one. Parties will be able to list up to two candidates on the ballot in ridings with two MLAs. You still only get one vote in your riding but you may be voting for a pair of candidates with that one vote (for example, if the NDP runs two candidates, you can vote for both at once). The first seat in each riding goes FPTP-style to the candidate with the most votes. The second seat in two-Member ridings will be assigned via proportional representation, so if the Greens get 17% of the popular vote, approximately 17% of the second seats will go to Greens. Those seats will be assigned in ridings where the Greens did particularly well, so the candidates that got the most votes will more-or-less be the ones who get seats.

  • What I like about this system
  • It’s not too big of a departure from our existing system from the voter’s perspective, so it’s less confusing for voters. Parties also need at least 5% of the vote to get any second seats, so it roots out fringe parties in most ridings.
  • What I don’t like about this system
  • I’m not sure it will cure the strategic voting issue we have. Because we’re still voting for one candidate or pair of candidates and there are still FPTP elements, I feel we will still need to carefully avoid vote splitting on the left.

Mixed-Member Proportional (MMP)

This system is already in use in other countries at national or sub-national levels, including Germany, New Zealand, and Scotland.

In this system, electoral districts are larger. Voters vote for a candidate to represent their riding, similarly to how we do now, using FPTP. You are also voting for a party (either through your candidate or through a separate vote – TBD) for regional candidates. So the Leg is made up of “district MLAs” – the people who represent your riding – and then a certain number of “regional MLAs” per party that top up the number of MLAs from that party to match the percentage of the popular vote given to that party. Do you follow?

Basically, you would either vote once or twice per election – once for an MLA and possibly once for a party (though your MLA vote may also be considered a party vote, which roots out independent candidates entirely). Some/most of the candidates would be elected the old fashioned way, but overall representation in the Legislature would be proportional because parties would be “topped up” to their vote percentage by candidates from their open regional list.

  • What I like about this system
  • It does seem like representation will be pretty accurately proportional. It is good that it’s been tested in countries with well-functioning democracies. There is a 5% threshold for representation to avoid fringe parties in government.
  • What I don’t like about this system
  • This might be more confusing for voters. We also don’t really have a say in who’s on the regional list for each party; we’re not voting for candidates, we’re voting for parties. This doesn’t work with the way everyone thinks of their right to be represented. There are also still quite a few questions marks about how this would work.

Rural-Urban Proportional (RUP)

This is a combo system not in use in this particular combination anywhere, though both aspects have been used successfully separately.

This is a combination of MMP (above) for Rural areas and STV (which we voted on in 2005 and 2009) for urban and semi-urban districts. In urban areas we would rank candidates on our ballot. So, I can vote for the NDP first, the Greens second, the Communist party third, and then not at all for the Liberals, or I can put them last on my ranking. This is more complex for Elections BC to count, but it does alleviate vote splitting.

There is a minimum number of votes in each riding, called the “quota”, that a candidate must reach. All candidates that reach this quota are elected. Candidates with the fewest votes are discarded and the votes go to the next candidate on that voter’s list. Candidates who get more votes than the quota have their extra votes transferred to the number two candidate on that voter’s list, and so on. Parties may run multiple candidates per riding, up to the number of seats available in that riding.

Rural districts would operate like MMP, with district MLAs elected to represent each riding and regional MLAs from a party list to top up.

  • What I like about this system
  • I love the idea of ranking candidates and the way it would alleviate vote splitting/strategic voting. This works well for voters who are often torn between two (or more!) candidates.
  • What I don’t like about this system
  • It would take a while to count and calculate results; there would need to be multiple rounds of counting because the system is so complex. I would not get my exciting election night sports watching experiences.
  • *EDIT: I spoke to an Irish friend who says that the counting actually goes pretty quickly and that election nights are very exciting indeed!

 

If you’re happy with the existing system, vote to keep it FPTP. If you’d like to give PR a try, what’s the harm?

2018 Holiday Challenge

November 26, 2018

We’re hosting our first challenge! From December 1st to the 31st we’re getting you to beat those winter blues, show some love for our trainers, and giving you some sweet discounts to reward your efforts. HOW IT WORKS There will be a big poster board up front where you’ll write your name down to take…

We’re hosting our first challenge! From December 1st to the 31st we’re getting you to beat those winter blues, show some love for our trainers, and giving you some sweet discounts to reward your efforts.

HOW IT WORKS

There will be a big poster board up front where you’ll write your name down to take part in the challenge. At each class you attend, request a sticker from the front desk to place by your name.

POINTS BREAKDOWN

REWARDS

40+ points = A chance to win a FREE month at Tight Club. Anyone that gets 40+ points are still eligible to get 30% off your first/next Tight Life Membership pass OR 15% off a 10 Class Pass

30+ points = 30% off your first/next Tight Life Membership month OR 15% off a 10 Class Pass

20-29 points = 20% off your first/next Tight Life Membership month OR 10% off a 10 Class Pass

10-19 points = 10% off your first/next Tight Life Membership month OR 5% off a 10 Class Pass

Not signed up for a Tight Life membership? Chat with your front desk pal to sign you up!

When we are closed for the holidays, you can still earn points by posting pictures of you doing something active outside! Stay tuned for more details.

Learning about Body Positivity with Diandra Oliver

November 1, 2018

Last week, Diandra Oliver took our crew through a Fat Positivity + Body Positivity workshop. Through the work she facilitated, we learned the difference between body positivity and fat activism, systemic discrimination against plus size and fat identified folx, and the ways we can value all bodies and the incredible things they do. We got…

Last week, Diandra Oliver took our crew through a Fat Positivity + Body Positivity workshop. Through the work she facilitated, we learned the difference between body positivity and fat activism, systemic discrimination against plus size and fat identified folx, and the ways we can value all bodies and the incredible things they do.

We got to know Diandra a little more and found out why this type of work is so important for the fitness community:

You’ve got a lot on the go! Tell us some more about yourself and the different initiatives you’re a part of:

I am a writer and activist from the ancestral territories of Kitselas and Kitsumkalum First Nations in Northwest, British Columbia. I grew up on mountains and in rivers, and moved to Vancouver in 2016. Since being in Vancouver I’ve jumped head first into the outdoors community, co-founding Vancouver’s first fat softball team, The Heavy Hitters and becoming the first Canadian ambassador for Fat Girls Hiking, supporting them to get their Vancouver Chapter up and running. This past summer I joined the Curvy Kili Crew, a group of awesome fat babes from all over North America who are hiking Mount Kilimanjaro for International Women’s Day 2019. The hike will be the first group fat hike of Kili and the Curvy Kili Crew has been featured all over the internet in social media stories, blog posts and podcasts. To get ready for the hike I’ve been training at Tight Club and at the beginning of October I completed a distance and elevation gain simulation of Kili which you can read more about on my blog here.

Outside of this hiking life, my partner and I parent our rad 8 year old kid. We basically run around the city eating noodles (his favourite is Mr. Red) and going to all of the swimming pools (faves are Eileen Daily in Burnaby and New Brighton pool in East Van). For work I’m a PhD student and instructor in the Geography department at Simon Fraser University. I study young people’s unemployment in Vancouver and how young people resist and advocate to have their economic realities acknowledged by the government and employers. Basically, if you were born after 1980 things are not good. Let’s fix it.

What inspired you to start this workshop?

I started working out at Tight Club with the Tight Life Challenge in January 2017. After spending decades experiencing fatphobia, homophobia and sexism in sports and fitness I had become weary about walking into anywhere new. But there was something about how Tight Club put the movement in front of the bullshit that inspired me and hooked me. Keighty, Jody, Kelsey and everyone at Tight Club was so welcoming those first three weeks and the Tight Life family was everything I needed to intentionally get my body moving again. I’ve always felt like my body was celebrated at Tight Club and it’s at Tight Club that I’ve learned to celebrate my body and what it can do.

This workshop came together because I want to support Tight Club to learn about gatekeeping in the industry (how the industry intentionally keeps fat people out by focusing on diet talk or by only having thin people in their advertising) and the systemic ways that fat folks are restricted from moving their bodies (eg. gear and clothing is not size appropriate, instructors often have traditional body types, and modifications are not always offered). I am excited to work with Tight Club to unpack the hierarchy of thinness and to develop a practice of inclusivity that supports and celebrates bodies of all sizes.

Why is it important?

Most fitness and sport spaces are alienating for fat folks. It’s really hard to go into a fitness space and not be bombarded with messages about weight loss. In our culture, gyms, fitness centres and “healthy living” are all so deeply connected to fatphobia and the diet industry (that profits off our own self-hatred). Fat Activism requires us to accept all bodies the way they are and to honour each person’s own reasons for moving their body however they want to or not. For example, I want to move my body to outlive my enemies and manage my anxiety, not to lose weight. Often when I’m working out regularly or on an elimination diet to deal with health stuff, family and friends are so excited that I’ve “lost weight” and do not hesitate in telling me that I look great and they’re so happy for me. I’ve begun to reply with a cheerful tone, “I haven’t lost any weight! I’m still fat but now I really love burpees!”. Committing to Fat Activism requires us to change the script away from happiness for weight loss to pride for gaining strength and living a tight life. The next step is taking that internal change and replicating it by advocating for all bodies in the systems around us.

What you hope others will take away from it?

I’m so proud of Tight Club and the work they’re doing to be an inclusive, safe space. It is exhausting to constantly be making space for yourself in a world that clearly doesn’t want you and it’s exciting when people in the industry stand up to do this hard work. I hope that as Tight Club deepens their practice of welcoming those folks who are typically marginalized by the fitness industry, folks will find it easier to walk into this space because it will be ready for them.


A huge thank you to Diandra for taking the time to teach us how we can make our space more accessible, inclusive, and how we can advocate for and support members with all types of bodies with empathy and solidarity. ALL BODIES are welcome here.

Sports Day Is Still The Best Day of the Year

October 1, 2018

It was no different this time around: Sports Day is THE BEST DAY OF THE YEAR! The weather gods were not on our side to start the day, but y’all still came out to play and were slippin’, slidin’, and sippin’ on Hey Y’alls. And as the day continued, the sun made an appearance and…

It was no different this time around: Sports Day is THE BEST DAY OF THE YEAR! The weather gods were not on our side to start the day, but y’all still came out to play and were slippin’, slidin’, and sippin’ on Hey Y’alls. And as the day continued, the sun made an appearance and before we knew it were basking in its warmth and everyone’s tight vibes.

Shout out to our amazing crew of volunteers who helped us pull this thing off!

And to these amazing peeps who made the day extra special:

Say Hey Cafe

Parkland

KIND Snacks

Hey Y’all

Cocos Pure

Swiss Water Coffee

Saucony

Scroll through to see some highlights from the day captured by our boy Grady Mitchell:

Outdoor Vices Summer 2018 Roundup!

September 30, 2018

Another summer has come and gone and with it a new batch of memories to last us a lifetime and damn, was it ever a good one. We hung out with familiar and new faces, laughed (A LOT), got sweaty (A LOT), saw you bust a move, and challenge yourselves in new ways. Endless love…

Another summer has come and gone and with it a new batch of memories to last us a lifetime and damn, was it ever a good one. We hung out with familiar and new faces, laughed (A LOT), got sweaty (A LOT), saw you bust a move, and challenge yourselves in new ways. Endless love to you all that make what we do every day sooooooo worth it. 

TIGHT BIKE

First up, let’s revisit the latest season of Tight Bike (including Rapha 100!) and hear from some of the crew on their favourite memories from this year:

I spent the whole Tight Bike season doing sloops. Every. Time. And I’m okay with it. I really wanted to be close to home because I’d been working so much. R&R was my main goal. But I also knew I needed to, and wanted to be on my bike, so a couple loops of Stanley Park after work was just what the Dr. ordered.

About three quarters of the way through the season, we made our way up to Prospect Point, as we did, and then…. we just…. stayed there. For like, quite a while. And it was great! It was a huge crew of us and we’d reach max-summer chillax – on a bike ride. We all knew each other but then we shot the shit and snapped photos. It took a push, but after a good span of time we all decided whether we’d do another loop or head home and off we went. A lovely eve.“ – CHANTELLE

My favourite rides are always the Sloops. It’s social and always a great ride with some fun competition up Prospect Point with a sweaty photo up top!

Any of the sloop photos are the best. Always sweaty and a solid group of peeps!” – ALFRED

Highlight of the season was meeting a bunch of like minded rad people who liking riding bikes! I joined to meet new people and make some friends.

Favourite ride was out to Iona beach, that was a really fun and fast ride and I really enjoyed it, plus I have never done that ride prior.“ – MATTHEW

Favourite ride: Social sloops that finished at Electric Bicycle Brewing; got some loops in and then drank beer with a good crew… what more could you ask for?” – KRISTY

RAPHA 100 

Photos by Jeff Kwok

 

TCRC

Our Tight Club Run Crew happens year round (every Tuesday at the Field House at 6:15 FYI), but running with pals while soaking in those summer rays is always a highlight. Back in July our friends at Outdoor Voices supplied our runners with “Doing Things” hats and we went out in the hood for a run and sweat session. Here are some of the highlights captured by Kezia Nathe:

MAKING MOVES SUMMER PARTY

You came, you danced, and you shot some hoops! Our Making Moves Summer Party brought out a tight crew to take part in our Free Throw Competition with Myodetox. Keep scrolling through to catch the highlights! Photos by Kezia Nathe:

And that’s a wrap for the summer of 2018!

Making Tight Moves!

June 19, 2018

We’re celebrating a summer of Making Moves! We’re stoked to launch this project: Making Moves. A product of passion and talent, of living the tight life and holding nothing back. A video to inspire movement; physical and otherwise. A creative expression of living the tight life, and making moves; whether that’s quitting your job and…