Tight Club Blog

Your Mind and Body are Talking to Each Other. Are You Listening?

April 6, 2019

Have you ever experienced a weird pain, or maybe an upset tummy, but you still decided to eat something not so great, or keep doing an activity even though it hurts? This is so common. So very very common. Our body sends our brain signals all the time, literally so much that we can go into autopilot. But other times the signals aren’t so subtle and they can even be super positive messages! Science shows that working out does exactly that. The chemicals your body produces when you get your blood flowing sends all sorts of positive messages to your brain, which ultimately help elevate mood, balance blood sugar and flush away stagnant energy.

This mind-body connection is also widely studied in the world of mental health. Often physical fitness helps to reduce the symptoms of anxiety and depression, which is a wonderful way to offer ourselves some much-needed self-care.

What Are You Training For? For many, mental wellness isn’t an easy thing to talk about or manage. We checked-in with our Tight Club community to learn more about how you prioritize mental wellness, alongside your fitness goals and learned so many great insights and perspectives. Thank you to our community for being vulnerable and open about your challenges. Today Charmaine and Kate share some of their perspectives and we are so grateful for their insights and willingness to share.

Jennifer Northup

3 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Tight Bike

How does fitness make you feel both physically and mentally?

Mentally, I feel like I’m almost turning my brain off, so all I’m thinking about is how I’m moving my body at that moment. So it gives you a break from kind of everything else. How does it physically connect? I think that anytime you are pumping your blood and getting your body moving the endorphins are going. So I think of scientifically what is going in my body. I think also that structure is really important to mental health too, and when you get into routines like getting up at 5 am to go swimming even though it’s raining and cold outside, it’s hard doing it, but once you finish you can say that I still have the rest of my day and I started my day off in a good way. There is something about routines that really supports mental health too.

Alfred Kolowrat

2 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Tight Bike

How does fitness make you feel both physically and mentally?

I think just focusing on the body movement and technique and how the endorphins are kind of motivating me to get an hour and a half indoor bike ride done, even though it’s mentally hard to keep that motivation going. The completion I think is really important because it’s like saying that I’ve won the day already, and it’s like 6 am, and you’ve already made the bed, had a workout… And sometimes it’s really hard, and some days we don’t do it, but when we do go for it, the day is a win already.

Vanessa Tam

5 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Booty Luv

How does fitness make you feel both physically and mentally?

Physically I feel strong and healthy when I’m working out. I think sweating is a good correlation with strength and health as well. And mentally, I feel really clear and I feel more focused. Especially if I’m stuck on something or if I find that I’m procrastinating or not getting the work done that I need to, then I feel like working out is a good way to refocus and clear my head mentally.

Cristina Alabado

5 years at Tight Club
Favourite Class: Booty Luv

How does fitness make you feel both physically and mentally?

If I feel fit, I also feel like I have enough energy to do what I want to do mentally, because otherwise, I have the exhaustion that is just draining. And you don’t want to do things you’d normally want to, like go out or just get projects done and see people and have the energy to do that. So for me, fitness is you’re looking good, feeling good and you’re able to do the things you want to do. So that transfers into your regular life as well.

Intro and interviews by Sarah Tesla. Photos by Bree Sopatyk.